What the Feds Said About ‘Supplement Not Supplant’ for Title III

November 25, 2008

LEARNING THE LANGUAGE–I hope you’ve had a chance to read my reports on this blog of what officials from the U.S. Department of Education have been saying about the “supplement-not-supplant” provision of Title III, the section of the No Child Left Behind Act that authorizes funds for English-language-acquisition programs. The provision says that money from Title III full story
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Gov. Bredesen Begins Budget Hearings

November 18, 2008

NASHVILLE, TN–Gov. Phil Bredesen started holding budget hearings Monday. The state faces an $800 million budget shortfall and he is calling for every department to cut 10 percent from their budgets. The governor isn’t ruling out the possibility of layoffs. full story
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District 63 officials blame language barrier for inadequate ISAT scores

November 14, 2008

NILES, IL–East Maine School District 63 and three of its schools failed make adequate yearly progress according to the standards of No Child Left Behind and the Illinois Standards Academic Achievement Test, but school officials said their test scores suffered because many of their students were forced to take this year’s test in a foreign language — English. full story
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City, county schools surpass state English language learner targets

November 13, 2008

GAINESVILLE, GA–Hall County and Gainesville schools passed all three annual measurable achievement objectives under No Child Left Behind pertaining to the performance of limited English proficient students last school year. Results from the annually administered ACCESS English Language Proficiency Test reveal 69.9 percent of the Hall County school system’s English language full story
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Grades are in for Tennessee’s students

November 13, 2008

NASHVILLE, TN–The state Department of Education today released Tennessee’s annual report card — detailed data on student achievement, discipline and demographics. According to the results, Tennessee met federal benchmarks in every category except with limited English proficient students. Overall the state is in good standing under the No Child left Behind law, which requires full story
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School district examines new testing calculations

November 13, 2008

HAMMONTON, NJ–The state Department of Education got permission from the federal government to change the way it calculates whether New Jersey’s public schools are meeting education benchmarks. Now Hammonton School District officials are examining what effect the decision will have on its students’ standardized test scores. The state redesigned its proficiency full story
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Central meets NCLB goals

November 13, 2008

CECELIA, KY–Central Hardin High School has met all of its goals for No Child Left Behind, a recent discovery the school’s administration made after an error was found in the results. Previously, Central wasn’t considered to have made annual yearly progress, or AYP, which is achieved by meeting all of the school’s listed goals, because they hadn’t made sufficient progress in full story
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GISD schools make adequate yearly progress

November 13, 2008

GRAHAM, TX–The Graham Independent School District made adequate yearly progress — by the slimmest of margins. The school district accomplished no small feat in meeting the required standards as outlined under the No Child Left Behind Act that allows the U.S. Department of Education to monitor how each public school and school district is performing. No Child Left Behind full story
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D65 subgroups fail to meet federal mandates

October 22, 2008

EVANSTON, IL–Administrators at Evanston/Skokie School District 65 have filed an appeal after failing to meet standards for the No Child Left Behind Act for the first time in three years. The appeal alleges the district was unfairly hurt by a change in the test given to “limited English proficient” students. In past years, these students were able to take a less complex test. full story


Student body makeup affects skills

October 22, 2008

DES MOINES, IA–Increased numbers of poor and immigrant students in Des Moines public schools are making it difficult to meet federal reading and math standards, school officials say. More than one-third of Des Moines public schools – 22 schools and the district itself – have been placed on a “schools in need of assistance” list for failing to meet proficiency expectations full story