Qualified Koreans to Serve as English Lecturers

October 29, 2008

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA–The government is overhauling its plan to recruit 23,000 new assistant English teachers among Koreans who don’t have teaching licenses, said the nation’s top educator. To improve English education, the government had planned to give them civil servant positions under 3-5 year renewable contracts. This plan, originally proposed by President Lee full story
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Six schools successfully achieve FELTOM accreditation

October 29, 2008

MALTA–Six of Malta’s foremost language schools have successfully completed a rigorous inspection process to qualify for FELTOM Accreditation. The chairman of the accreditation council, Professor Mark Borg, confirmed that am Language Studio, EC Malta, Inlingua, the Institute of English Language Studies, NSTS – ELI and Sprachcaffe fulfil the required criteria to become fully full story
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Resolving a Clash of Development Objectives – Social Justice vs Need for English

October 29, 2008

COLOMBO, SRI LANKA–When I received the invitation from Father Placidus which I felt privileged and happy to accept, my mind went back to my early days in school and recalled the awe and adulation in which we held that great icon of the education system of those times – the Late Rev. Fr. Peter Pillai. I had my schooling at Royal at a time when the Rector of St. Joseph’s full story
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Learning English in Afghan badlands

October 28, 2008

SHERZAD DISCTRICT, AFGHANISTAN–“I am a boy and you are a girl – please repeat after me,” says the English language teacher. The unlikely setting for the class is the remote eastern Afghan village of Kodi Khel, against a backdrop of the White Mountains of the Hindu Kush. In 2001 the White Mountains saw violent clashes between Afghan-American forces and Osama Bin Laden’s full story
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Rwandans Say Adieu to Français

October 28, 2008

KIGALI, RWANDA–C’est la vie. In another blow to the language of love, the Rwandan government has decided to change instruction in schools from French to English. All government employees are now required to learn English, and everyone here from lawmakers to taxi drivers to students to businesspeople seems to believe that the usefulness of French, full story  complete coverage
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Reining in rogue colleges

October 27, 2008

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA–Sunshine College of Management teaches hairdressing and hospitality — two subjects with apparently little in common, except that both fields of work appear on the Federal Government’s list of desperately needed skills from migrants. In fact, what they do have in common is that international students who complete such courses are awarded extra full story


Learning should be a pleasant experience

October 27, 2008

LAHORE, PAKISTAN–The 24th conference of the Society of Pakistan English Language Teachers (SPELT) concluded at the AIE auditorium on Sunday with a pledge to bring about a visible change to classrooms by making learning a pleasant experience. On the concluding day, local and foreign presenters held 20 workshops on various pedagogical issues. full story


96% of Private Kindergartens Offer English Classes

October 27, 2008

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA–Nearly all private kindergartens run English classes, Rep. Choi Jae-sung of the Democratic Party said Thursday. Choi conducted a survey of 274 private kindergartens across the country and found that 262 or 96 percent provide English classes. The monthly tuition for English classes averaged at 25,000 won per child. The kindergartens were found to full story  related story


Competition is forcing English into kindergartens

October 27, 2008

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA–More than nine out of 10 private Korean kindergartens are disregarding the curriculum determined by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology and are teaching English to their students. Teaching English in kindergarten is illegal under the Early Childhood Education law. In South Korea, the kindergarten curriculum is under the jurisdiction full story  related story


‘English’ city lies at heart of Jeju’s development plans

October 24, 2008

JEJU, SOUTH KOREA–First there were English villages where Korean students could go to practice their language skills. Now there are plans to build an entire city where the lingua franca, including the medium of instruction, will be English. It’s a highly ambitious plan and one fraught with challenges, especially given the uncertainty of the global economy. But, if it works, full story