Teachers will mind language

December 2, 2008

DARWIN, AUSTRALIA–The Territory Government is facing a revolt from remote teachers who vow to continue teaching in Aboriginal languages, despite an order to teach in English. Award-winning teacher Yalmay Yunupingu said yesterday she would refuse Departmental orders not to teach in her own language of Yolngu Matha. The Territory Government says from full story complete coverage
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It’s No Secret: Progress Prized In Brownsville

December 2, 2008

BROWNSVILLE, TX–Here at Cromack Elementary School, near the border of the United States and Mexico, many children in the early grades are taught in Spanish. By 4th grade, those students have made the smooth transition to classes where practically all full story
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Rwanda: English Language Teaching Kicks Off

December 2, 2008

KIGALI, RWANDA–The recent government decision to use English as the language of instruction has kicked off in some schools, with teachers enrolling for the language alongside their students. Among the schools that have started implementing English language is St Patrick primary school in Kicukiro district. full story
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It’s Carnival Time

December 2, 2008

LEARNING THE LANGUAGE–For this 8th edition of the ELL/ESL/EFL carnival, bloggers provide answers to some of the questions I presume that educators of English-learners might have. OK, I admit that the first question may not exactly have been on the tip of your tongue, but it could help some ELL teachers to stretch in how they engage students. full story
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ELL challenges not insurmountable

December 1, 2008

NASHVILLE, TN–Davidson County is home to more than a quarter of all Tennessee’s English language learners — a situation that poses challenges to Metro Schools in terms of funding. School district leaders say there are questions as to whether the state’s funding formula for ELL students provides appropriate compensation for the resource-intense process of helping kids learn English. full story
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Increasing Hispanic population affects schools

December 1, 2008

CHARLESTON, SC–A striking surge in Hispanic students at one Charleston County elementary school has changed the way its educators do business. The school communicates with its Hispanic parents in their native tongue, and teachers work hard to overcome students and their families’ language barrier. Hispanic students make up nearly half of the roughly 750 students full story
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Future of English Language Teaching

November 26, 2008

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA–What is the future of English language teaching? The answers appear to be more students taking more exams and using more technology in the classroom. However, the question is whether this is really a surprise to anyone working in an ESL or EFL environment like Korea full story
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Most Native English Teachers in Seoul are Unqualified

November 25, 2008

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA–It has been reported that some of the native English instructors working in Seoul’s schools are uncertified or have not taken TESOL, a special course for teachers of English to foreigners. According to a report on an audit submitted to Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education on Monday by Nam Jae-kyong of Seoul Metropolitan Council, just 166, or 20.5 percent full story
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21% of Foreign Teachers Hold Teaching Licenses

November 25, 2008

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA–About 21 percent of native English-speaking teachers at primary and secondary schools in Seoul hold teaching licenses. According to data provided by the Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education to Nam Jae-kyong, a Seoul Metropolitan Council member, 166, or 20.5 percent of 810 foreign English teachers at schools in Seoul, have teaching licenses. full story
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ESL students speak in future tense

November 25, 2008

YAKIMA, WA–Juli Salatino’s third-period class is a bit different from her others. Her portable classroom at Davis High School, generally filled with teenagers learning Spanish, is instead occupied by a variety of students working through English verbs and sentence structure. This is her English as a Second Language, or ESL, class. And, for these non-native English-speakers full story
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