Overseas student ID cards begin

November 25, 2008

LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM–The fingerprinting of overseas students for biometric identity cards has begun for those extending their visas. It is the first phase of tighter visa restrictions which will eventually affect more than 300,000 people applying to study in the UK each year. The tougher rules are intended to prevent the abuse of student visas as a way of gaining entry to the UK. full story
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Voter Suing Over Spanish Language Ballots

November 25, 2008

DELTONA, FL–Volusia County’s Supervisor of Elections is being sued by a voter who says ballots should be available in Spanish for Puerto Rican citizens who do not speak English. Crimilda Perez-Santiago filed a lawsuit with the help of a group known as Latino Justice out of New York. The group said based on a 1965 law, Puerto Ricans were granted the right to vote in their native full story
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Schools to get ‘Immigrant Children’ grant from state

November 25, 2008

BETHEL, CT–Families of the six children in an English as a Second Language class at Berry School came to Bethel from Ecuador, Albania and China. “We’re working on vowels, short ‘a’ and short ‘i’,” ESL tutor Joanne Matteo told the children last week. About 10 percent of Bethel students come from families that do not speak English. Spanish or Portuguese is spoken in most full story
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What the Feds Said About ‘Supplement Not Supplant’ for Title III

November 25, 2008

LEARNING THE LANGUAGE–I hope you’ve had a chance to read my reports on this blog of what officials from the U.S. Department of Education have been saying about the “supplement-not-supplant” provision of Title III, the section of the No Child Left Behind Act that authorizes funds for English-language-acquisition programs. The provision says that money from Title III full story
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Most Native English Teachers in Seoul are Unqualified

November 25, 2008

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA–It has been reported that some of the native English instructors working in Seoul’s schools are uncertified or have not taken TESOL, a special course for teachers of English to foreigners. According to a report on an audit submitted to Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education on Monday by Nam Jae-kyong of Seoul Metropolitan Council, just 166, or 20.5 percent full story
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21% of Foreign Teachers Hold Teaching Licenses

November 25, 2008

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA–About 21 percent of native English-speaking teachers at primary and secondary schools in Seoul hold teaching licenses. According to data provided by the Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education to Nam Jae-kyong, a Seoul Metropolitan Council member, 166, or 20.5 percent of 810 foreign English teachers at schools in Seoul, have teaching licenses. full story
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ESL students speak in future tense

November 25, 2008

YAKIMA, WA–Juli Salatino’s third-period class is a bit different from her others. Her portable classroom at Davis High School, generally filled with teenagers learning Spanish, is instead occupied by a variety of students working through English verbs and sentence structure. This is her English as a Second Language, or ESL, class. And, for these non-native English-speakers full story
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Foreign student numbers increase

November 25, 2008

AUGUSTA, GA–The number of foreign students enrolling in Augusta colleges are at the highest levels in years, part of a trend seen statewide and nationally. The Medical College of Georgia experienced a drastic decline in international enrollment from the 2000 to 2001 school years. Provost Barry Goldstein said he was unsure what caused it. full story
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ESOL parents gather for information

November 25, 2008

ROGERS, AR–Seven years ago, Monica Hernandez came to Arkansas not being able to speak English. It was through a pastor who helped interpret during one of her children’s parent / teacher conferences that she was encouraged to learn English, in which she is now fluent. full story
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