Florida can’t afford to cut ESOL training

October 27, 2008

MIAMI, FL–Learning a foreign language can be daunting. In Florida, there are almost a quarter-million public-school students learning English for the first time. They’re expected to pass the FCAT in a year. Talk about intimidating. Those students don’t only have to speak English fluently, they must master grammar and reading at their grade level. Yet research shows it takes two to five full story


More Resources For ESL/EFL/ELL News & Research

October 27, 2008

LARRY FERLAZZO’S WEBSITES OF THE DAY–I’m adding two new blogs to The Best Ways To Keep-Up With Current ELL/ESL/EFL News & Research. One is ESOL World News and the other is ESOL TrendWatch.  They’re both by John Brezinsky, and published by Pearson/Longman Publishers.  The fact that they’re sponsored by a publisher gives me a little pause, but it doesn’t seem to affect what John writes. full story


U.S. v Cengage Learning Holdings I, L.P., et al.

October 27, 2008

BACKGROUNDNOW–WHEREAS, Plaintiff, United States of America, filed its Complaint on May 28, 2008, and the United States and Defendants, Cengage and Houghton Mifflin, as defined below, by their respective attorneys, have consented to the entry of this Final Judgment without trial or adjudication of any issue of fact or law, and without this Final Judgment full story


Instructional materials on public display

October 27, 2008

EUREKA, CA–The public is invited to preview and submit comments on kindergarten through eighth grade Reading/Language Arts and English Language Development textbooks and instructional materials. The materials are currently on display at the Learning Resource Display Center located in the Louis D. Bucher Resource Center at the Humboldt County Office of Education full story


Reining in rogue colleges

October 27, 2008

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA–Sunshine College of Management teaches hairdressing and hospitality — two subjects with apparently little in common, except that both fields of work appear on the Federal Government’s list of desperately needed skills from migrants. In fact, what they do have in common is that international students who complete such courses are awarded extra full story


Community Colleges Pursue Many Paths to Create International Campuses

October 27, 2008

THE CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION–For community colleges, global is the new local. Long attuned to turning out graduates whose skills are calibrated to the needs of nearby companies, two-year colleges are now striving to meet the demands of multinational businesses seeking workers who can succeed in a worldwide marketplace. full story


U.S. jobs lose appeal for intl. students

October 27, 2008

PHILADELPHIA, PA–Many international students may be looking to return home after graduating from Penn in the next few years. Between the economic downturn and the limited availability of H-1B visas – which allow international students to work in the U.S. after graduation – U.S. job offers seem less attractive than they would in normal years. “For many international students, full story


Learning standard English is about more than passing tests

October 27, 2008

HONOLULU, HI–The sophomores I teach at a private school here in Honolulu are busy gearing up for an annual fall rite of passage: the PSATs. This nationwide standardized test prepares them for the SATs their junior year, and the results of those SATs will play a significant role in determining what colleges admit them as seniors. full story


Learning should be a pleasant experience

October 27, 2008

LAHORE, PAKISTAN–The 24th conference of the Society of Pakistan English Language Teachers (SPELT) concluded at the AIE auditorium on Sunday with a pledge to bring about a visible change to classrooms by making learning a pleasant experience. On the concluding day, local and foreign presenters held 20 workshops on various pedagogical issues. full story


Coming to America: Blessings and challenges

October 27, 2008

ATHENS, GA–Yesenia “Jessie” Martinez is light-years from Tamazula de Gordiano, the Mexican farming community where she grew up. An older man forced her into marriage at age 14 and made her cross the border into California, where she worked 12 hours a day in tomato fields and orange groves. full story