Economic Troubles – Effect on EFL

October 16, 2008

GUY COURCHESNE–Troubled economic times we’re in, if you’ve been following the news. In Mexico, we’ve seen the peso lose a lot of value against the dollar. What does this mean for EFL in Mexico, and teaching abroad in general? I wouldn’t fret. One of the immediate effects of an economic slowdown in Mexico and other developing countries will be job losses, particularly in the export sector. full story


U.S. economic slump hits international students

October 16, 2008

BOSTON, MA–Citigroup Inc. is canceling loan programs that made it easier for international students at Harvard University, MIT and the University of Michigan to obtain money for education, causing some borrowers to say they might have to go back home. full story  a second newspaper  third newspaper  fourth newspaper


Bilingual teaching on ballot

October 16, 2008

PORTLAND, OR–In less than three weeks, Oregon voters will decide the method by which non-native speakers are taught English in the state’s public schools. If approved, Ballot Measure 58 would prohibit teaching non-English-speaking students in their native language for more than two years. The measure — intended to ensure that non-English speakers learn English — has created a fierce full story


Team effort

October 16, 2008

LANGUAGE TRAVEL MAGAZINEMany associations representing language teaching institutions have become industry standard-bearers for quality, creating links with fellow associations in the field and working collaboratively with governments to ensure legislative change benefits their members and their clients. Gillian Evans reports. full story


Australia riding wave of popularity for ELT

October 16, 2008

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA–Australia’s popularity as a destination for English language study is at an all-time high, according to the latest statistics from English Australia, which identify a 12 per cent increase in students in 2007. Contributing AUS$1.5 billion (US$1.4 billion) to the economy, 137,019 students studied English in Australia last year, with the majority coming from Asia (78 per cent). full story


Student life assessed in NZ

October 16, 2008

WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND–Three-quarters of international students (72 per cent) are satisfied with life in New Zealand, but they have a clear desire to mix more readily and easily with native New Zealanders. Teaching quality is rated the best in the English language teaching/private sector and two-thirds of students are planning on permanent residence in the country. full story


Pro Linguis sold to Kaplan Inc.

October 16, 2008

SWITZERLAND and UNITED STATES–one of the largest language travel agencies in Switzerland, Pro Linguis, has been sold to Kaplan Inc. in the USA, marking a gradual trend towards vertical integration in the industry. Don Quijote in Spain and Navitas in Australia are other examples of private education providers with part or full ownership of outbound student travel agencies. full story


Centro Latino reopens at new location

October 16, 2008

WILMINGTON, NC–Centro Latino, a resource center for local immigrants run by the nonprofit Amigos Internacional, has relocated and reopened at the St. Mary Catholic Church campus. The center, which is now operating out of a one-room office at 320 S. 5th Ave., reopened in its new location at the end of September. After five years of helping immigrants full story


Virtual Reality world used to teach language

October 16, 2008

COLIMA, MEXICO and AMMAN, JORDAN–If you’re trying to learn a new language and nothing seems to work, many people will suggest the full-immersion treatment. That way, there is no choice but to learn the language. If you’re looking to try the method without moving to a foreign country, the answer may be just around the bend. full story


Classes speak volumes to immigrant students

October 16, 2008

TOMS RIVER, NJ–Menrique Susana has one wish: “I want to speak English more better.” To that end, Susana, 28, of Mexico, and about 30 other adults Tuesday night attended the first session this school year of the English as a Second Language class for adults taught by Maria Brito, the ESL supervisor for the Toms River Regional School District. The class is free, supported by full story